Posted 2 years ago

biomedicalephemera:

Development of the bones of the hand, infancy to eight years of age

Click through for detail and age information.

Skiagraphic Atlas Showing the Development of the Bones of the Wrist and Hand, for the use of students and others. John Poland, 1898.

Posted 2 years ago

GET IN MY LIFE.

Posted 2 years ago

The results of the SCoR’s recent 2011 Students and Graduates Survey shows that nearly nine out of ten newly-qualifieds (89%) found a job within three months of graduation.

chordae-tendineae:

And within six months of qualifying, 100% of graduates had found employment. This statistic compares favourably to the UK average of 61.9% of graduates from all subject areas, and the average for all allied health service graduates (87.3%)*.

awwww yeah.

Posted 2 years ago

I made a new blog.

It’s more focused on life as a student radiographer. There’s not much there at the moment but I’m working on it!

Posted 2 years ago
benwyattandcondescendingturtles:

THIS IS WHERE THE HEART SHOULD HAVE BEEN (shown with my poor photoshop skills).

THIS. OVER AND OVER AGAIN.

benwyattandcondescendingturtles:

THIS IS WHERE THE HEART SHOULD HAVE BEEN (shown with my poor photoshop skills).

THIS. OVER AND OVER AGAIN.

Posted 2 years ago
The owner of that photograph described the procedure as an injection of a type of ink into her body in one of the comments, which is why I added that description. Just to be clear, before I am further mocked by other tumblr-ers...
tiny-ears asked

I haven’t mocked you. I only stated that it wasn’t ink.

Posted 2 years ago

tiny-ears:

(by nametor)
An exam performed by monitoring injected ink.

Contrast medium not ink. It looks like it’s a hysterosalpinogram, but I haven’t seen enough to say for definite!

Posted 2 years ago

To make sure I post regularly, I wanna start doing themed weeks. So if you have any ideas for themes, let me know!

Posted 3 years ago
Posted 3 years ago

tebazile:

This is my right ankle. I fell down the stairs in the parking garage at work on November 15, 2006. Yep going on 5 years and today as I was getting off the elevator at work, I began to limp. It was weird and just out of nowhere. Maybe one of the screws hit a nerve.
I have a plate with 6 screws in it on the side of my leg and then 2 long screws coming from the bottom of my foot.

Posted 3 years ago
uglyuglyugly:

Zahra Aboutalib, from Morocco, delivered a child she’d been carrying for almost half a century. This shocking yet fascinating story began in 1955 when Zahra went into labor. She was rushed to a hospital, but after watching a woman dying on the operation table during a Caesarean section, Zahra fled back in her small village outside Casablanca. After the pains were gone and the baby stopped kicking, Zahra considered him a “sleeping baby”. “Sleeping babies” are, according to Moroccan folk belief, babies that can live inside a woman’s womb to protect her honor.
When Zahra was 75, the excruciating pains occurred again. Doctors performed an ultrasound test and discovered that her “sleeping child” was actually an ectopic pregnancy. What is even more amazing is how Zahra survived and how the dead fetus was accepted by the body just like another organ. Generally, this doesn’t happen. If not discovered in time, the growing fetus will eventually strain and burst the organ that contains it. Under these circumstances, the mother has few surviving chances. After nearly five hours, the surgeons successfully removed Zahra’s calcified fetus.
Stone babies, lithopedions, are an extremely rare medical phenomenon. According to the Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine, only 290 cases of stone babies have been documented.

uglyuglyugly:

Zahra Aboutalib, from Morocco, delivered a child she’d been carrying for almost half a century. This shocking yet fascinating story began in 1955 when Zahra went into labor. She was rushed to a hospital, but after watching a woman dying on the operation table during a Caesarean section, Zahra fled back in her small village outside Casablanca. After the pains were gone and the baby stopped kicking, Zahra considered him a “sleeping baby”. “Sleeping babies” are, according to Moroccan folk belief, babies that can live inside a woman’s womb to protect her honor.

When Zahra was 75, the excruciating pains occurred again. Doctors performed an ultrasound test and discovered that her “sleeping child” was actually an ectopic pregnancy. What is even more amazing is how Zahra survived and how the dead fetus was accepted by the body just like another organ. Generally, this doesn’t happen. If not discovered in time, the growing fetus will eventually strain and burst the organ that contains it. Under these circumstances, the mother has few surviving chances. After nearly five hours, the surgeons successfully removed Zahra’s calcified fetus.

Stone babies, lithopedions, are an extremely rare medical phenomenon. According to the Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine, only 290 cases of stone babies have been documented.

Posted 3 years ago

moshita:

human anomalies xray

Posted 3 years ago
One of the best mobile machines ever?

One of the best mobile machines ever?

Posted 3 years ago

spottedtowhee:

Baby turtles on the way!

Posted 3 years ago

spottedtowhee:

Horses unfortunately don’t politely lay down when you want them to be anesthetized; anesthesia is horses is risky for many reasons, but one of them is that upon initial administration of your anesthetic, they are standing, and then they fall.  That is just the nature of these animals.  This is minimized with using a padded stall and floor, however, sometimes they do injure themselves.

This horse presented with a simple fracture of the leg.  It was anesthetized for surgical repair, but when it went down, it fell onto the injured leg.  The second photo shows the leg after the fall.

The horse had to be euthanized on the table.  

Just one of many reasons I don’t intend to enter equine practice.

Eeesh that’s a nasty fracture!